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Get 5 Tips On Clinical Review and Primary Care Update Course

Get updates on the latest recommendations of medical subspecialties important to the primary care physician in our comprehensive course consisting of lectures, workshops, and panel discussions. Watch the first few lectures free.
Leila M. Tolaymat, MD, Pragnesh P. Parikh, MD, Neill R. Graff-Radford, MD, Katherine M. Moore, MD, Denise M. Harnois, DO
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GET 5 TIPS ON CLINICAL REVIEW AND PRIMARY CARE UPDATE COURSE


  1. HOW TO TREAT ACNE

Acne affects about 40 to 50 million individuals in the U.S. every year. Although it's more common in our adolescent patients, it can also continue through adulthood, and the social psychological impact is undeniable. These patients can be very self-conscious. They can start to develop social isolation. And this often can lead to depression. It is quite challenging to treat acne, and so we're working to try to improve their acne quickly. 


Leila M. Tolaymat, MD reviews: 

  • Impact of acne vulgaris on our patients. 
  • Challenges in the treatment of acne vulgaris. 
  • Guidelines for the treatment.
  • Treatment approaches based on clinical morphology of a patient's acne and their acne severity. 

Watch full video: Acne (21:26 min)

Leila M. Tolaymat, MD


  1. WHAT IS ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME (ACS)?

You've all seen this, probably the classification for chest pain, typical angina is defined as substernal chest discomfort, provoked by exertion, and relieved by rest or nitroglycerin. If they have all three of these things, then it's typical angina. It must be your heart. If it's two of the three. It's atypical angina. And if it's one or none of the three, then it's considered nonanginal, noncardiac heart pain. Sounds easy right? Well, it turns out that these things are very non-specific. Anginal symptoms can be anything from the nose to the navel.


Pragnesh P. Parikh, MD uncovers the unspecificity of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), discussing: 

  • The evaluation diagnosis of suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS),
  • The initial management of ACS
  • And then the long-term management of ACS

Watch full video: Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS)  (26:03 min)

Pragnesh P. Parikh, MD


  1. WHAT PARTS OF THE BRAIN ARE AFFECTED AND UNAFFECTED BY ALZHEIMER'S?

What is Alzheimer's? Is it the anatomy? Alzheimer's makes patients have excellent remote memory, but that’s anatomy and Alzheimer's have excellent remote memory. Alzheimer doesn't affect the whole brain. It does not affect the motor area or the sensory area. It doesn't affect the cerebellum, nor the basal ganglia. So, knowing how pathways are actually well-preserved, 


Neill R. Graff-Radford, MD explores the anatomy of Alzheimer's and helps refine what this disease is and your patient’s specific problem is, reviewing:

  • The history of Alzheimer's and the first recorded patient.
  • What pathways in the brain are damaged or unaffected by Alzheimer's, and how that affects your patient’s day-to-day life.
  • Case-by-case analysis through interviews with Alzheimer's patients

Watch full video: Alzheimer's Disease: What Can I Do Now? What Does the Future Hold? (38:30)

Neill R. Graff-Radford, MD


  1. HOW TO PRESCRIBE FOR ANXIETY DISORDERS

There’s up to a 31 percent lifetime prevalence of any anxiety disorder diagnosis – social anxieties are particularly common. People miss work because of these conditions. Relationships are impaired. Substantial functional impairment has been documented in up to 40 percent of patients with anxiety go untreated. So there's a real opportunity for us to to intervene, to help people with anxiety and anxiety disorders are associated with an independent risk for suicide.


Learn how to treat the three major anxiety disorders: generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and panic. Katherine M. Moore, MD reviews:

  • Off label uses of medications. 
  • Which medications are FDA approved for specific anxiety disorders

Watch full video: Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care (25:44)

Katherine M. Moore, MD


  1. WHY LFTS ARE COMMONLY USED INCORRECTLY

Learn about the issue with the approach to patients with abnormal liver tests or elevated liver tests. A Liver Function Test, or LFT,  is a commonly misused term often used to indicate some type of liver issue. What these tests are actually called are the Liver Injury Tests or Liver Biochemistries. They reflect injury to either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. The measures of liver synthetic function are the actual LFTs such as INR, Bilirubin, and Albumin. And liver failure is a syndrome of jaundice, coagulopathy, and encephalopathy.


In this course video, Denise M. Harnois, DO reviews: 

  • Medical liver-related terms that you might be using wrong
  • How to use a LFT correctly in a case
  • Why celiac disease is a more likely outcome than you would expect.

Watch full video: Approach to the Patient with Abnormal Liver Tests (24:29)

Denise M. Harnois, DO


Upon completion of the full, 42-video course, you should be able to:

  • Discuss preventative care for patients with IBD
  • Review board of medicine regulations
  • Review developments in Parkinson’s disease
  • Discuss tools for diagnosing depression
  • Discuss behavioral management of obesity
  • Identify new evidence-based treatment, using the most up-to-date clinical and scientific information
  • Discuss current diagnostic and therapeutic options for common illnesses seen in primary care


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